2019-06-27

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley - Netflix

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley is the flagship evening television news program of CBS News, the news division of the CBS television network in the United States. The program has been broadcast since 1948 under the original title CBS Television News, eventually adopting its current title in 1963. Since June 6, 2011, the weekday editions of the program have been anchored by Scott Pelley. Since 2012, Jim Axelrod has served as anchor of the Saturday edition, while Jeff Glor anchors the Sunday edition. Previous anchors have included Douglas Edwards, Walter Cronkite, Dan Rather, Bob Schieffer, and Katie Couric.

The program's Monday through Friday editions air live at 6:30 PM in the Eastern and 5:30 PM in the Central Time Zones, and are tape delayed for the Mountain Time Zone. A separate "Western Edition", featuring updated segments to provide coverage of breaking news stories, airs live at 6:30 p.m. in the Pacific Time Zone and on tape delay in the Alaska and Hawaii–Aleutian Time Zones.

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley - Netflix

Type: News

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2008-08-27

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley - CBS Evening News - Netflix

CBS Evening News (titled as CBS Evening News with Jeff Glor for its weeknight broadcasts since December 4, 2017 and simply CBS Weekend News for its weekend broadcasts) is the flagship evening television news program of CBS News, the news division of the CBS television network in the United States. The “CBS Evening News” is a daily evening broadcast featuring news reports, feature stories and interviews by CBS News correspondents and reporters covering events across world. The program has been broadcast since May 3, 1948 under the original title CBS Television News, eventually adopting its current title in 1963. The program is anchored by Jeff Glor. Previous anchors have included Douglas Edwards, Walter Cronkite, Dan Rather, Connie Chung, Bob Schieffer, Katie Couric, Scott Pelley, and Anthony Mason. Weekend editions of the CBS Evening News weekends began in February 1966. On May 2, 2016, CBS announced that the weekend editions would be rebranded, effective May 7, as the CBS Weekend News, with Reena Ninan anchoring on Saturdays, and Elaine Quijano Sundays. The weekday edition of the CBS Evening News airs live at 6:30pm in the Eastern and 5:30pm in the Central Time Zones, and is tape delayed for the Mountain Time Zone. A separate “Western Edition”, featuring updated segments to provide coverage of breaking news stories, airs pre-recorded at 5:30pm in the Pacific Time Zone and on tape delay in the Alaska and Hawaii–Aleutian Time Zones.

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley - Walter Cronkite (1962–1981) - Netflix

Walter Cronkite became anchor of the program titled Walter Cronkite with the News on April 16, 1962. On September 2, 1963, the program, retitled CBS Evening News, became the first half-hour weeknight news broadcast of network television and was moved to 6:30 p.m. Eastern time (the Huntley-Brinkley Report on NBC expanded to 30 minutes exactly one week later on September 9, 1963). As before, some affiliates (including flagship owned-and-operated station WCBS-TV in New York City) had the option of carrying a later edition, this time scheduled for 7:00 p.m. Eastern Time. NBC also allowed this practice for the Huntley-Brinkley Report, with ABC later following it for the ABC Evening News (now ABC World News Tonight). The networks ended this practice after 1971, although some affiliates – mostly in larger markets – continued to carry the national newscasts at 7:00 p.m. Eastern Time on a half-hour tape delay. The CBS Evening News was first transmitted in color as a one-evening test broadcast on August 19, 1965, before permanently switching to the format on January 31, 1966. Cronkite's prime time special report, Who, What, When, Where, Why, broadcast on February 27, 1968, ended with his declaration that the United States could only hope for a stalemate in Vietnam. It is often credited with influencing Lyndon Johnson's decision to drop out of the race for President. “If I've lost Walter Cronkite ... [I]'ve lost Middle America”, he stated. Under Cronkite, the newscast began what would eventually become an 18-year period of dominating the ratings among the network evening news programs. In the process, Cronkite became “the most trusted man in America” according to a Gallup Poll, a status that had first been fostered in November 1963 through his coverage of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. In late 1972, Cronkite prodded the show's producers to feature two nights of lengthy explanation on the Watergate scandal, which had been extensively covered by The Washington Post, but had not received major national coverage. After the first half of the report, shown on a Friday, ran for 14 minutes – roughly half of the air time of the broadcast – White House officials complained to CBS founder William S. Paley. The second half of the report was aired the following Monday, but only for eight minutes.

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley - References - Netflix